Posts Tagged ‘Where to train BJJ in Western Mass’

Springfield BJJ asks, Is Brazil the Most Important Country in UFC History?

ANAHEIM, CA - NOVEMBER 12:  UFC World Heavyweight Champion Junior dos Santos is seen in the octagon at UFC on Fox:  Live Heavyweight Championship at the Honda Center on November 12, 2011 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images) Jason Merritt/Getty Images

Brazil is the most important country in the history of mixed martial arts, but not in the history of the UFC.

When the UFC burst onto the scene in 1993 and had a Brazilian by the name of Royce Gracie as its poster boy, the whole concept of “mixed rules” fighting was a new thing to contemporary American sports scene, then obsessed with boxing and unrealistic Karate/Kung Fu films.

However, “no holds barred” fights were nothing new in Brazil. These sport of fighting was called “Vale Tudo” which was Portuguese for “anything goes,” and it became immensely popular in Brazil in the 20th century.

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The biggest stars of the Vale Tudo scene?

The Gracie family.

Their patented weapon?

Gracie Jiu-Jitsu.

Their fighting art (which was basically Judo modified to focus more on ground techniques rather than throws and arbitrary competitions for points) was eventually exported via Rorion Gracie, who traveled to the United States and, after some struggling, managed to get on his feet and even break into Hollywood, where he is famous for teaching Mel Gibson a bit of Jiu-Jitsu.

Rorion’s exploits, as well as those of the Gracie family, were written about in an edition of Playboy magazine that caught the attention of an advertising mogul by the name of Art Davie. Davie and Rorion came up with an early version of the UFC (then called War of the Worlds).

This meeting, along with the help of pay-per-view executive Robert Meyrowitz, led to the creation of the UFC and the airing of the inaugural event in which Rorion’s relative Royce Gracie showcased how effective the family art could be against someone who didn’t know it.

But it wasn’t exactly the family art.

What they (brilliantly) branded and marketed as “Gracie Jiu-Jitsu” was actually Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. The Gracies didn’t invent it; they just packaged it and sold it better than anyone else.

Nevertheless, it started a martial arts revolution.

Soon after the first UFC events, serious fighters began training in all facets of Jiu-Jitsu. You had to know BJJ, or at least how to counter it, if you were going to be successful in the cage.

This lead to strikers cross training in BJJ. Once the BJJ fighters realized that the strikers knew what they knew, they started training in striking, and mixed martial arts was born.

Thus, Brazil and BJJ helped to create the modern sport of mixed martial arts, but it wasn’t the most country in the UFC’s history.

Yes, a Brazilian with a Brazilian fighting style helped create the UFC, but that was the old UFC, the UFC owned by the Semaphore Entertainment Group.

The modern-day UFC is owned by a company known as Zuffa. And it’s Zuffa that’s responsible for much of the UFC’s current success.

Zuffa backed the UFC even when it was making a loss, and eventually got the UFC onto Spike TV in the form of a reality show called The Ultimate Fighter. The show catapulted the UFC into stardom practically overnight; it had a place in society now.

The UFC would continue to grow and hold events in other nations, but its principle fanbase was in the United States, and more UFC shows were held in the United States than any other country (since it was and is an American company, after all).

But that’s not to discount what Brazil has done for the modern UFC. Many of the Zuffa era’s best fighters—such as Anderson Silva, Junior Dos Santos and Jose Aldo—are all from Brazil. The Brazilian market is also a massive one for the UFC, and the MMA circuit in Brazil is ripe with amazing, undiscovered talent.

Still, while it was Brazil that ultimately created MMA and the old UFC, it was the actions of Americans in the United States that helped bring it to it’s current heights.

Both countries have their importance, and modern MMA/the modern UFC couldn’t exist without either.

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Bruce Lee, Father Of Mixed Martial Arts MMA Jeet Kune Do

Western Mass BJJ is a big fan of how Bruce Lee affected martial arts in Springfield Ma.
Mixed martial arts or MMA as this popular fighting sport is commonly known is a combination of different martial arts combat styles including kickboxing, jiujitsu, wrestling, boxing and others.  The MMA fighters are basically using the most effective fighting techniques from different styles of martial arts in the ring.  Interestingly enough, there is a Bruce Lee connection to MMA.
So instead of training in just one discipline like wrestling or boxing, MMA fighters must train in a variety of techniques from different martial arts which make them better rounded fighters.  Although it may seem like a novel or revolutionary concept, this idea of using the best of different martial arts styles is not new.
In fact, the martial arts legend and action movie star Bruce Lee, is considered by many in the martial arts world to be the father of mixed martial arts.  He was the first to publicly advocate training in a variety of martial arts styles including western boxing and wrestling.
Bruce Lee moved away from being a traditional martial artist utilizing classical forms, stances and techniques.  He created his own style of martial arts called Jeet June Do which is pretty well his style of mixed martial arts.  He even compiled his ideas of mixed martial arts in his book called Tao of Jeet Kune Do.
This caused some controversy among some of the traditionalists in martial arts back in his time, especially before he became famous through his movies.  But as time went on, even after his death, his concepts became more accepted by modern martial artists around the world.  He has influenced countless numbers of martial artists to train with a variety of martial arts techniques.
History now suggests that Bruce Lee was way ahead of his time with his early ideas of mixed martial arts.  If he can only see what he has started now with the explosion of MMA as a popular sport.  He would be certainly be proud.  The mixed martial arts MMA world definitely owes a lot to Bruce Lee for having the ingenuity and courage to go against the traditionalists to develop the mixed martial arts concept so many years ago.
Brought to you by Western Mass BJJ

Andre Galvao vs Xande Ribeiro, semi absoluto preta Abu Dhabi Pro 2012

 

 

courtesy of new england bjj

Western Mass BJJ Fighters

Marco Alvan

Team Link 2nd Degree Black Belt & Head Instructor/Owner of Team Link
-2006 Hall of Fame Instructor of the Year
-2009 Naga Expert Division Champion
-2009 IBJJF Black Belt New York Open Champion
-2011 Naga New England Expert Division Champion
-2011 IBJJF Black Belt Boston Open Champion
-2011 IBJJF Pan American NO GI Black Belt Champion
-Coach of 11 Time Naga Best Overall Team
-Coach of Naga 2011 Kids Overall Team Champions
-Coach of Grapplers Quest 2011 Kids Overall Team Champion

Gabriel Gonzaga

Team Link Black Belt & Head Instruc

-UFC Heavyweight contender & #2 Knockout in UFC History
-2006 Mundials Gold Medal Winner Ultra Heavy Weight Division
-BJJ Black Belt World Champion

Brian American

Team Link Brown Belt and Head Instructor/Owner of Team Link Enfield
-2004 North American Grappling Champion
-2007 NAGA World Champion
-2007 Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Federation Champion
-2007 Bay State Grappling Champion
-2008 NAGA New England Champion
-2008 Team Link Super Fight Champion
-2009 NAGA Expert Division Champion
-2011 US Grappling Submission Only Open Weight Expert Division Champion
-2012 NAGA Champion
-Numerous Top 3 Finishes in Various Tournaments

Eric Marandino

TEAM LINK BROWN BELT
-11X NAGA Champion
-2X Link Champion
-PLUS 16 TOP 3 FINISHES IN VARIOUS TOURNAMENTS

More to come!!!