Posts Tagged ‘Best BJJ School in Western Mass’

Cesar Alvan Wins 1st Place in Gi and No Gi at NAGA 6/30/2012

Great combination of Judo and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu by Cesar in the grappling competition last Jun 30 2012. Cesar Alvan won both 10 years old expert divisions with and without Gi 80 to 90lb and at the end was promoted to a orange belt. In this video he is competing his teamate Mike what was a warrior and fought very brave too! Congratulations for both kids!

www.linkbjj.com

Advertisements

Essential Reading for Jiu Jitsu in Western Mass

For this article I thought I would take a few minutes to recommend a few good books for Jiu Jitsu students to read. If you take the time to study these books I really feel that it will help you learn and grow as a Jiu Jitsu student and Martial Artist. The following books have all been selected for various reasons and have something to offer for everyone.

1. “The Talent Code” by Daniel Coyle

This is a fascinating book on the study of genius and talent in all areas of life. The application of this to your Jiu Jitsu training, competition career or development into a great martial artist will become immediately apparent! It is such a great book that I often buy it as a gift and always recommend it to everyone regardless of their skill set, knowledge or position in life. It will change your perception and understanding of what it takes to be great in your field and really can change your life!

2. “Advanced Jiu Jitsu” by Marcelo Garcia

Does anything really need to be said about this? Marcelo Garcia is one of the greatest Jiu Jitsu competitors of all time and this book offers you an insight into some of the techniques and strategies that make him stand a head and shoulders above the competition.Very detailed and insightful, you will learn a lot about what makes Marcelo tick why and how he does what he does. A great book that you simply must have in your Jiu Jitsu library!

3. “The Art Of Learning” by Josh Waitzkin

An entertaining read into the mind of a chess prodigy who went on to study Kung Fu and even become one of Marcelo Garcia’s first black belts! Although the book makes no mention of Jiu Jitsu it is a thoroughly enjoyable read and offers great insight into the ability to learn, question, solve problems and overcome obstacles.

4. “Submit Everyone” by Dave Camarillo

Finally a book on strategy and the application of tactics in Jiu Jitsu! “Submit Everyone” is a brilliant guide in hunting for the submission. Dave treats the mat as a battleground and teaches you how to wage war on your opponent and emerge the victor! The material taught in this book is not available anywhere else for Jiu Jitsu students. A sensational book, one of a kind and hopefully the first in a series to come!

So there you have it, four of my top recommendations as essential reading for all Jiu jitsu students and anyone interested in the grappling arts! I highly recommend you make these books a part of your own personal library, you will not regret it! :-)

Western Mass BJJ asks you to visit www.linkbjj.com to start training in Springfield Mass area

3 Effective Ways to Use Cold Therapy to Increase Recovery – Western Mass BJJ

In the quest for more performance humans will try just about anything. In the days of the early Olympics athletes consumed bulls testicles in the belief it gave them strength. Early marathon runners drank a mixture of brandy, arsenic, and cocaine to dull the painful effects of the run. And if you really want a glimpse into the darkness professional sports can reach, read Breaking the Chain by Willy Voet, which describes in gory detail the cocktails of drugs used in professional cycling in their efforts to win and cheat the system.

But what if you don’t want to travel down that path? Is there a way to get more out of your body than you currently are?

Training is really quite a simple process. We stress the body, and then allow it to recover from the stress to achieve a new level of performance. You can increase stress by increasing volume and/or intensity. But what if you’re an athlete who is nearly at your limit of sessions per week that can be performed, or you are seeking to increase volume in the short term to peak for an event? You might be a CrossFit Games competitor or a triathlete trying to fit in crazy volume and intensity, but you need help recovering faster to get to that next level of performance.

That means it’s time to get chilly.

You know how if you get injured there’s the RICE recommendation? Rest, ice, compression, and elevation? Well, the ice helps to reduce inflammation, which allows treatment and healing to begin sooner.

And you know that stress I spoke of, that we are deliberately placing on the body? The muscle soreness we get from training is just another type of injury, often called micro-trauma, which results in muscle swelling and inflammation. If you can reduce inflammation, then you reduce post exercise muscle soreness – meaning you can train again sooner!

So cold therapy can be a great tool to allow us to get back into training sooner and here’s three ways to make it work:

1.Cold water immersion – This is exactly what it says and it’s what is being done by athletes when you see them in ice baths and the like. I’ll be honest, this is not much fun, but research shows cold water immersion for fifteen minutes post exercise can lead to maintenance of work output in subsequent efforts.

2.Contrast therapy – The muscle flushing effects of alternating periods of hot and cold have been well documented for some time. Alternating hot and cold for one to two minutes at a time for periods of up to fifteen minutes has been shown to reduce swelling and lead to faster restoration of speed and power post training.

3.Recovery swimming – This may not be practical for many, but is certainly something our train-a-holic triathletes could take part in. If you finish your dry land sessions – run, ride, or gym, it won’t matter – with a recovery swim in a cold pool you will be able to achieve many things at once.Firstly, you’ll achieve all the things that cold water therapy is good for – reduced soreness and inflammation and increased ability to maintain training intensity in the following sessions. Perhaps even more importantly you’ll also add valuable swim time, allowing you to master the technique faster (and swimming is largely technique based, far more than riding and running). It is important not to swim so that you “see rainbows at the end of the pool”, to quote Soviet coaches, but merely enough to work some of the lactic acid out, allow the body to be in the colder environment for a period. (And don’t forget that some aerobic work has been seen to be beneficial in reducing recovery time.)

Western Mass BJJ asks you to visit www.linkbjj.com to start training in Springfield Mass area

Is Jiu Jitsu Changing? Springfield MA

 

What if I told you the answer to that question might be “no”. Most people would say that the answer can’t be “no”- not now at least, not after the evolution that has occurred over the last decade. You can point to the exponential growth of competition and it’s competitors, the availability of high-level instruction, the prevalence of video instruction, and a growing group of professional jiu jitsu athletes as proof that the sport has advanced far beyond where it was just 10 years ago. But, all of those things are elements of the sport, not the jiu jitsu. So again I’ll ask the question, has the jiu jitsu actually changed?

There is no doubt jiu jitsu techniques are hard to hide in this day and age, and that new positions and techniques are available like never before. Now with live streaming of every major event, and YouTube, there are no more secrets, so it forces everyone to evolve and grow. But are the fundamentals that win championships any different than they were 10-15 years ago? Earlier this year when we were out in San Diego visiting Master Royler Gracie, he shared something with us that was sort of eye-opening. He told us that the approach he would take to competition now would be no different than the approach he took in 1999 (discussing technique and strategy). Now you are more than welcome to form your own opinions about this topic, but I can tell you that Royler was very sincere in this sentiment.

Let me submit an argument that perhaps you don’t always have to learn the “latest” techniques (although there is nothing wrong with this) to compete at the very highest level in this day and age. The case would be that jiu jitsu in it’s pure unadulterated form can be learnt and applied the same way today in competition as it was in 1999, and that in fact, jiu jitsu’s effectiveness is not changing, merely it’s competitors.

 

Exhibit A: Royler winning the Mundials in the late 90′s

 

Exhibit B: Kron winning the Pans in 2008 with relatively similar, and equally fundamental BJJ

 

Exhibit C: Roger Gracie,  one of the most dominant competitors in the last few years

I understand completely that it is pretty absurd to suggest that jiu jitsu isn’t changing, especially given what you see the Mendes Bros., Miyao Bros., and other high level competitors doing on the mats, but I would simply like to suggest the idea that jiu jitsu is not evolving beyond it’s own effectiveness.  The premise of this article is that fundamental jiu jitsu is never changing, even though the execution might look different.

How can this benefit you? Don’t always concern yourself with learning everything that’s out there. Learn  proven technique from qualified instructors, and focus on application. All jiu jitsu works, old and new. So study all the above videos, there si something we can all learn from each of them.

Visit www.linkbjj.com

Learning BJJ in Springfield MA Through Film Study

When you were in college or high school how did you get ready for a test? Ideally you would have studied, right? So why should you treat jiu jitsu any differently. In jiu jitsu you attend class, just like in school. So when you go home from school you should study if you want to be at the top of the class. The same applies to jiu jitsu; however, jiu jitsu is different in some ways from school. Jiu jitsu is hands on, that’s why it is hard to learn by yourself. You need a partner and physical instruction to fully develop. But that’s not to say you can’t learn a lot from studying on your own. The question is, what is the best way?

Think of film and print study as a way to determine and structure your physical training. You can think of this in a variety of ways including: what types of exercises you should do, what drills will be most effective for you, how to build your own “game”, and which techniques you should work on. Allow film and print study to spark your imagination and creativity. The best jiu jitsu players throughout history have been very innovative, gound-breaking, and creative. Think of people like Rafeal Mendes, Cao Terra, and historic figures like Royler Gracie and Leo Viera. Studying techniques, competition, and philosophy can help you expand your vision of where jiu jitsu can go. All this intellectual enlightenment will lead you towards your own personal development in jiu jitsu, and will help you develop a personal style and learning method that you can use forever.

With all that in mind, a great resource for technique, inspiration, and philosophy is Stuart Cooper Video’s. He is a filmmaker that specializes in jiu jitsu mini-documentaries. His videos provide great insight into the world of jiu jitsu.

Take some time and get lost of some of these great productions: http://www.stuartcooperfilms.com/martial-arts/

Or view the videos on Vimeo here…

Thanks for reading

If you want to learn Brazilian Jiu Jitsu(BJJ) or MMA in Western Mass click here www.linkbjj.com

MMA in Springfield MA: Roger Gracie Returns To The Octagon In July

Roger Gracie Returns To The Octagon In July

The BJJ in MMA legend, Roger Gracie, will finally return to MMA action after an 8 month layoff. The jiu jitsu ace has recently inked a deal to train out of the Blackhouse gym in California with guys like Anderson Silva and the Nogueira brothers. Following his bout with King Mo, Roger has decided to move down a weight class to welterweight. He will be taking on another relative new-comer to the welterweight division on a Strikeforce card set for July.

Roger Gracie has been penciled in to take on UFC-veteran, Keith Jardine. Roger GracieJardine is fresh welterweight himself, fighting for the first time in that division against current champion, Luke Rockhold.

Keith Jardine has never been submitted in his MMA career, but he’s also never faced a guy like Roger Gracie. Jardine is a classic ‘stand and bang’ type fighter who will be in deep waters if the fight hits the ground against a guy like Gracie. Jardine’s wrestling is decent, but I don’t seem him being able keep this on the feet for the duration of a 15 minute bout. As soon as this hits the mat, I expect Roger to work his game to perfection.

Although the bout has been set, there’s no official date for the event. It’s expected that Tim Kennedy will be gunning for Luke Rockhold’s belt on the same card, but that bout has not been confirmed.

If you want to train MMA in Springfield MA, there is only one place, Team Link.  www.linkbjj.com

BJJ in Springfield MA brings to you a look at ACL Injuries.

Someone blows out an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). We have all heard of it, and hopefully not experienced it. The ACL (see where it is located) is an important component of knee joint stability. Tearing an ACL means surgery, recovery, and rehabilitation. Although modern techniques have shortened the time it takes to get back to full functionality, it still takes months (and possibly a lost season) to arrive there.

knee injury, acl injury, acl tear, soccer injury, bjj injuryWhat exactly do we know about the mechanism(s) of ACL injuries today? It is now thought a combination of factors cause the ACL to rupture. Let’s take a look.

A non-contact (no other person/external force involved) landing from a jump movement can cause an ACL injury. Evidence presented at the Orthopaedic Research Society 2012 Annual Meeting, however, demonstrated the injury mechanism that causes the ACL injury involved a combination of factors as opposed to a single factor, which many have claimed. It is a common belief that a rupture can occur in the ACL via a single plane motion – the tibia (lower leg bone) moving forward due to a significant quadriceps contraction.

According to Timothy E. Hewett, PhD, FACSM, Director of Research, Ohio State University Sports Health and Performance Institute and Cincinnati Children’s Sports Medicine Bio-dynamics Center, ACL injuries can be due to a tri-planar multi-dimensional combination of factors. “Sometimes in science we have a lot of clinical expertise and a lot of engineering expertise but we don’t have much—what I call–‘common sense-pertise’.”1

Hewett continued:

Is it just anterior (forward) translation that strains and tears the ACL? Is it just knee abduction (outward movement) or that inward motion that ruptures the ACL? Is it just internal rotation that tears the ACL? Our study demonstrates that each one of these factors can strain the ACL. But it is the combination of anterior translation, abduction and internal rotation that likely ruptures the ACL.2

Contrary to conventional wisdom, Dr. Hewett’s study demonstrated abduction strained the ACL more than anterior translation. In addition, internal rotation was similar to that of anterior translation.

The researchers also had a unique discovery regarding internal rotation torque. “We showed abduction increased the load on the ACL just as much as anterior translation did. Internal rotation increased load just as much as anterior translation did. But most importantly, when all three are combined, there was an additive effect in all three planes,” Dr. Hewett explained.

To investigate the issue further, Dr. Hewett and his colleagues conducted simulated jump landings on 19 subjects. There were 17 (89.5%) ACL failures using a custom designed drop-stand.

knee injury, acl injury, acl tear, soccer injury, bjj injuryThe subjects were divided into two loading groups: without anterior shear and with anterior shear. They tested the effects of anterior tibial shear, abduction, and internal rotation under dynamic axial loading on ACL biomechanics. They found that single-axis abduction increased average ACL strain from 5.8 to 9.8 percent. In both groups, the addition of abduction or internal rotation increased ACL loading—with abduction loading the ACL more than internal rotation.

Under axial impact, the combination of abduction, internal rotation, and anterior shear increased the average ACL strain significantly. This lead Dr. Hewett to declare, “Data from this study indicates that the most critical dynamic condition that leads to ACL failure is a combination of anterior shear, abduction and internal rotation under axial impact.”

Here is what can be derived from this study: during athletic competition (or any other activity) where a variety of movements/forces are placed on the knee joint, the structural integrity of the joint (the muscles, tendons, and ligaments securing it) can be compromised. In the past, it was believed that one single abnormal deviation was the root cause of an ACL rupture. However, it now looks like multiple deviations will cause a compromise, thus injury.

Can all ACL ruptures be avoided? Obviously there is no way to guarantee that. How can one then minimize their risk of tearing the ACL? Strengthen the knee joint musculature in the weight room and safely practice sports skills. Perform conditioning activities that progressively adapt the knee muscle, tendon, and ligament structures to forces that will be experienced during competition (e.g., position drills, agility drills).

While ACL injury is a frequent occurrence in sports, with these precautions and this new knowledge there is also new hope your knee will not be exposed to a combination of forces that exceed the structural integrity of the joint.

If you live in Springfield, Indian Orchard,Palmer, Chicopee, or Wilbraham Massachusetts check out Team Link Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

www.linkbjj.com

 

Someone blows out an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). We have all heard of it, and hopefully not experienced it. The ACL (see where it is located) is an important component of knee joint stability. Tearing an ACL means surgery, recovery, and rehabilitation. Although modern techniques have shortened the time it takes to get back to full functionality, it still takes months (and possibly a lost season) to arrive there.

knee injury, acl injury, acl tear, soccer injury, bjj injuryWhat exactly do we know about the mechanism(s) of ACL injuries today? It is now thought a combination of factors cause the ACL to rupture. Let’s take a look.

A non-contact (no other person/external force involved) landing from a jump movement can cause an ACL injury. Evidence presented at the Orthopaedic Research Society 2012 Annual Meeting, however, demonstrated the injury mechanism that causes the ACL injury involved a combination of factors as opposed to a single factor, which many have claimed. It is a common belief that a rupture can occur in the ACL via a single plane motion – the tibia (lower leg bone) moving forward due to a significant quadriceps contraction.

According to Timothy E. Hewett, PhD, FACSM, Director of Research, Ohio State University Sports Health and Performance Institute and Cincinnati Children’s Sports Medicine Bio-dynamics Center, ACL injuries can be due to a tri-planar multi-dimensional combination of factors. “Sometimes in science we have a lot of clinical expertise and a lot of engineering expertise but we don’t have much—what I call–‘common sense-pertise’.”1

Hewett continued:

Is it just anterior (forward) translation that strains and tears the ACL? Is it just knee abduction (outward movement) or that inward motion that ruptures the ACL? Is it just internal rotation that tears the ACL? Our study demonstrates that each one of these factors can strain the ACL. But it is the combination of anterior translation, abduction and internal rotation that likely ruptures the ACL.2

Contrary to conventional wisdom, Dr. Hewett’s study demonstrated abduction strained the ACL more than anterior translation. In addition, internal rotation was similar to that of anterior translation.

The researchers also had a unique discovery regarding internal rotation torque. “We showed abduction increased the load on the ACL just as much as anterior translation did. Internal rotation increased load just as much as anterior translation did. But most importantly, when all three are combined, there was an additive effect in all three planes,” Dr. Hewett explained.

To investigate the issue further, Dr. Hewett and his colleagues conducted simulated jump landings on 19 subjects. There were 17 (89.5%) ACL failures using a custom designed drop-stand.

knee injury, acl injury, acl tear, soccer injury, bjj injuryThe subjects were divided into two loading groups: without anterior shear and with anterior shear. They tested the effects of anterior tibial shear, abduction, and internal rotation under dynamic axial loading on ACL biomechanics. They found that single-axis abduction increased average ACL strain from 5.8 to 9.8 percent. In both groups, the addition of abduction or internal rotation increased ACL loading—with abduction loading the ACL more than internal rotation.

Under axial impact, the combination of abduction, internal rotation, and anterior shear increased the average ACL strain significantly. This lead Dr. Hewett to declare, “Data from this study indicates that the most critical dynamic condition that leads to ACL failure is a combination of anterior shear, abduction and internal rotation under axial impact.”

Here is what can be derived from this study: during athletic competition (or any other activity) where a variety of movements/forces are placed on the knee joint, the structural integrity of the joint (the muscles, tendons, and ligaments securing it) can be compromised. In the past, it was believed that one single abnormal deviation was the root cause of an ACL rupture. However, it now looks like multiple deviations will cause a compromise, thus injury.

Can all ACL ruptures be avoided? Obviously there is no way to guarantee that. How can one then minimize their risk of tearing the ACL? Strengthen the knee joint musculature in the weight room and safely practice sports skills. Perform conditioning activities that progressively adapt the knee muscle, tendon, and ligament structures to forces that will be experienced during competition (e.g., position drills, agility drills).

While ACL injury is a frequent occurrence in sports, with these precautions and this new knowledge there is also new hope your knee will not be exposed to a combination of forces that exceed the structural integrity of the joint.